ArchitEx 2015, 1st – 2nd December 2015 St George's Hall, Liverpool, L1 1JJ

At the heart of Liverpool’s St George’s Quarter and directly opposite Lime Street Station, St George’s Hall is a breathtaking venue and the most perfect choice for the UK Architecture & Building Design Exhibition and Conference.

St George’s Hall is widely regarded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings in the world and is a Grade I listed building.

St George’s Hall stands 169ft long and 74ft wide with a tunnel vaulted ceiling – the largest of its kind in Europe. The ceiling is supported on massive red granite columns, with figures portraying qualities Victorian Liverpool aspired to – art, science, fortitude and justice.

Behind the gold leaf and porticoes, the Hall has one of the greatest brick arches in the world and houses a priceless mosaic floor of 30,000 tiles. When the unique Minton tiled floor was uncovered to mark the Hall’s centenary in 1954, more than 100,000 people queued to see it.

St George’s Hall is widely regarded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings in the world and is a Grade I listed building.

St George’s Hall stands 169ft long and 74ft wide with a tunnel vaulted ceiling – the largest of its kind in Europe. The ceiling is supported on massive red granite columns, with figures portraying qualities Victorian Liverpool aspired to – art, science, fortitude and justice.

Behind the gold leaf and porticoes, the Hall has one of the greatest brick arches in the world and houses a priceless mosaic floor of 30,000 tiles. When the unique Minton tiled floor was uncovered to mark the Hall’s centenary in 1954, more than 100,000 people queued to see it.

St George’s Hall is widely regarded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings in the world and is a Grade I listed building.

St George’s Hall stands 169ft long and 74ft wide with a tunnel vaulted ceiling – the largest of its kind in Europe. The ceiling is supported on massive red granite columns, with figures portraying qualities Victorian Liverpool aspired to – art, science, fortitude and justice.

Behind the gold leaf and porticoes, the Hall has one of the greatest brick arches in the world and houses a priceless mosaic floor of 30,000 tiles. When the unique Minton tiled floor was uncovered to mark the Hall’s centenary in 1954, more than 100,000 people queued to see it.

St George’s Hall is widely regarded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings in the world and is a Grade I listed building.

St George’s Hall stands 169ft long and 74ft wide with a tunnel vaulted ceiling – the largest of its kind in Europe. The ceiling is supported on massive red granite columns, with figures portraying qualities Victorian Liverpool aspired to – art, science, fortitude and justice.

Behind the gold leaf and porticoes, the Hall has one of the greatest brick arches in the world and houses a priceless mosaic floor of 30,000 tiles. When the unique Minton tiled floor was uncovered to mark the Hall’s centenary in 1954, more than 100,000 people queued to see it.

St George’s Hall is widely regarded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings in the world and is a Grade I listed building, and is the centre of Liverpool’s traditional cultural forum whose foundation stone was laid in 1838. It was reopened in 2007 by Prince Charles after a £23m refurbishment programme.

Built in the early 1800s as a space for music festivals and the Civil and Crown courts, the hall has always been at the heart of community life in the city.

It was built as a result of separate competitions to create a fitting space for the aspirational city to hold its music festivals and other assemblies and contains the vastly ornate Great Hall with its vaulted ceiling, Minton tiled floor, replete with maritime and civic symbolism and is also home to a massive pipe organ.

Over 25,000 people gathered outside when John Lennon was killed, and in excess of 65,000 witnessed Liverpool’s spectacular European Capital of Culture People’s Opening in 2008.

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The ArchitEx 2015 Exhibition Hall                

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 The ArchitEx 2015 Main Conference Room

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Photo below showing the distance between St George’s Hall on the right, and Lime Street Station on the left, distance 100 metres.

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